About Author

Digsby – a Chat and Email Client (plus Social Networking) All Rolled Up Together

Digsby – a Chat and Email Client (plus Social Networking) All Rolled Up Together

When I’m running Mac OSX, I use Adium as my chat client. In Linux, Pidgin (previously Gaim) fits the bill. Each of those clients is multi-protocol, which means that all my chat accounts, whether or not they’re on AIM, MSN, Yahoo or Jabber (or one of nearly a dozen supported protocols), can be used from inside the same application.

I’d seen word about a new, similar client for Windows called Digsby, which was supposed to (eventually) be available for Mac and Linux as well. Unfotunately, that day has not yet arrived, but since I recently reinstalled Windows XP (in order to watch NBC’s Olympics coverage online), I decided to take Digsby out for a spin, and I have to say I like what I see. 5 Tools to View Private Instagram Profile will be efficient for the person. The chatting of the person in the email box will be effective for the person. An increase in the traffic will be there to get the desired results. An online search will be possible for the person with less effort. 

First, since Digsby is at its core a chat client, let’s look at which chat protocols it supports. All the big ones, as you can see: AIM, MSN, Yahoo, ICQ, Google Talk, Jabber, and Facebook Chat. Again, what this means to the everyday user is that it’s no longer necessary to download AIM, Yahoo Chat, Google Talk, or any other of the dozens of “official” chat clients. In my experience, about all the official clients are good for is pushing ads you don’t want to see, so why not go for a client that can do it all? It just makes sense to me.

Like many popular clients, Digsby also includes different themes for its chat window, and styles for its contact window. This lets you customize Digsby far beyond what a standard official client, and in my short time is right up there (as far as customizability, if not yet the sheer number of available looks), as a program like Adium, and that’s saying a lot. From different skins to a variety of options for sorting, Digsby can be whatever you want it to be.

One aspect of Digby that caught me off-guard was the fact that I needed to sign up in order to use it. The surprise wasn’t that I needed to provide my username and password in order to sign into the different chat accounts – I expect that, obviously – but that I need an actual Digsby user account in order to use it. I finally figured out (I think) that this is because Digsby offers synchronizations between computers and (hopefully), between operating systems. What this means is that if I have Digsby installed on multiple computers, I just log in, and instantly all my customizations, from the look of Digsby to my personalized status messages, are right there waiting for me. That’s pretty cool, in my mind.

But Digsby is more than just a chat client, although if that’s all you wanted to use it for, it would be enough to justify installing it. Digsby is also an email client. Sort of. By that I mean Digsby is never going to be a replacement for a full-featured desktop client like Microsoft Outlook or Mozilla Thunderbird, but Digsby does give you access to your inbox, can check standard web-based clients such as Gmail, Yahoo and MSN, plus regular POP or IMAP email accounts. It checks these accounts regularly, and spawns a pop-up window whenever you receive new mail. You can also, while chatting with a friend, sent him or her an email, choosing from however many email accounts you’ve set up. Even better, if you want to send a quick message to a friend who’s offline, you can do that as well, all within Digsby’s regular chat window, just by clicking on the email tab.

Finally, Digsby supports some social networks, such as Facebook, MySpace and Twitter. Just give Digsby your account information, and you’ll receive all your updates, tweets and feeds just as you would from the web interface or a dedicated client.

All in all, I’m more than impressed with what I see in Digsby. I had expected a nice chat client, which I got, plus basic email, which I got as well, but the overall ease of use, the style and the added functionality of the social networking really puts Digsby over the top in my book. High class, all the way around. Now if they’d just hurry up with the Mac and Linux versions, I’d be a happy guy.

Mark Campus

Mark Campus

Mark Campus is a content marketer who owns Keenan’s room. A writer by day and a reader by night, he is loath to discuss himself in third person.